Prague will buy the former Orionka depot in Vinohrady from the transport company

Prague will buy the former Orionka depot in Vinohrady from the transport company
Prague will buy the former Orionka depot in Vinohrady from the transport company
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The former Orionka carriage house. Photo: IPR Prague

Prague will buy the former Vozovna Královské Vinohrady, known as Orionka, from its transport company (DPP). The price is set by a court expert at approximately 189.8 million crowns without VAT. The sale was approved on the first Monday of April by the city council in the position of the DPP general meeting. The rolling stock ceased to serve its purpose in the mid-1950s, and in 2009 the DPP classified it as residual property. The first part of the depot was created in 1897, when a hall was built along Korunní prída.

Orionka is a former tram and trolleybus depot, consisting of several plots of land and buildings. The main building is a building with three industrial halls, an office building and an apartment building heated by a gas boiler.

The area also includes warehouses, gatehouses or shelters and a ramp for washing vehicles. The yard is lit and there are also historic tram tracks laid by František Křižík in 1897.

The city wants to acquire the area in its ownership in the long term. According to the previous plans of the municipality, the cultural and community center Orionka is to be created in it, the project of which is being prepared. The area is now also intended to be used for spending free time, the zoning plan on the site allows for the planting of greenery.

The area of ​​the former depot is currently partially rented out, this concerns offices, rooms in the building or rooms for the establishment of office and storage spaces, as well as the area intended for parking.

The article is in Czech

Czechia

Tags: Prague buy Orionka depot Vinohrady transport company

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