Ukrainians are deciding what to do after the liberation of the occupied territories. But what if the Russians also occupy Mykolaiv or Odessa?

Ukrainians are deciding what to do after the liberation of the occupied territories. But what if the Russians also occupy Mykolaiv or Odessa?
Ukrainians are deciding what to do after the liberation of the occupied territories. But what if the Russians also occupy Mykolaiv or Odessa?

Done hundred and eighty-fifth, August 27

A discussion broke out on Ukrainian social networks about how Crimean hotels should be used after Ukraine regains Crimea. Opinions differ: someone suggests turning them into state centers for the rehabilitation of veterans, someone, on the contrary, offers to return them to the original Ukrainian owners, and the property of the Russians will then be put up for auction. Others propose to demolish half of the hotels, as they are said to be too outdated, to give the rest of the resorts to the Poles, British and Americans in order to express their gratitude for military and humanitarian aid and at the same time restore the poor Crimean tourist service. Another group occasionally joined the debate, most concerned about how to use the huge naval base at Sevastopol most effectively, but this group was advised to move to places where naval issues were dealt with and find opponents there.

Kind of absurd isn’t it? Where is the Ukrainian victory? It’s far away, and with a question mark on top of that. But Ukrainians are able to talk quite seriously about how to live after the war and how to organize everything and what needs to be done now – apart from the victory.

It is funny that similar thought processes, similar moods can be heard in Crimea itself. An acquaintance of mine from Yalta started asking me a week ago what plans the Ukrainian leadership has for the people of Crimea. “Haven’t you thrown away your Ukrainian passport yet?” I asked. “No!” So ​​I gave him advice: “Try not to lose him. And you’ll still have time to throw out the Russian one.” The inhabitants of Crimea live with two passports, except for the most stupid supporters of Putin, but there are not many of them.

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The article is in Czech

Tags: Ukrainians deciding liberation occupied territories Russians occupy Mykolaiv Odessa

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