Meat and milk on ration. In Russia they are already printing food stamps

Meat and milk on ration. In Russia they are already printing food stamps
Meat and milk on ration. In Russia they are already printing food stamps

Some authorities in Russia have started printing food stamps. However, residents are reassured that this is a planned activity and therefore there is no cause for concern.

A printer in the Russian city of Tula, about 150 kilometers south of Moscow, has started printing food stamps. The footage taken in the printing house appeared on the Dvach telegram channel, writes the local daily Tula Pressa. According to the footage, the tickets are intended to be used to purchase meat and meat products, dairy products or salt.

According to the local authorities, there is no need to worry. “The Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Tula Region is working on updating documents on the supply of food and non-food products to the population. This activity is in accordance with the applicable laws and was planned,” the regional government told the newspaper.

Anton Herashchenko, adviser to the Ukrainian Interior Minister, also noticed the video. “This is Russia’s way of trying to cope with the lack of basic food. And the authorities pass it off as taking care of the population,” he writes on

.

The ration system with the use of food stamps serves to limit the consumption of insufficient food and to better distribute it among the population. It operated on the territory of the Czech Republic during the Second World War and continued until the 1950s.

But they have fresher memories of him in Russia. Due to the lack of food as a result of the collapse of the Soviet economy, the authorities had to introduce a rationing system for certain foods there in the 1990s.

Watch the TN Live interview with Zdenek Petráš, an expert from the University of Defense, about Russia’s inability to mass-produce weapons:

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The article is in Czech

Tags: Meat milk ration Russia printing food stamps

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